Harvard Business Review discovers design fiction

Design fiction
By force of habit, most executives tune down their imagination when strategizing. This is counterproductive, the authors argue. Instead, they offer an alternative: Design fiction. A design technique that immerses executives and employees deeply in various possible futures, it uses artifacts such as short movies, fictitious newspaper articles and imaginary commercials to generate transformation roadmaps.

The search engine for UX research

Research Bookmark
The people behind Research Bookmark, a vast online collection of UX research resources, have - after months of researching and experimenting - released a search engine built just for UX Researchers.

[Book] Expand: Stretching the Future By Design

Expand
From transforming the ways we do business and reimagining health care, to creating planet-restoring housing and humanizing our digital lives in an age of AI, Expand explores how expansive thinking across six key areas—time, proximity, value, life, dimensions, and sectors—can provide radical, useful solutions to a whole host of current problems around the globe.

Behavioral science driven public policy “led astray”

What nudge theory got wrong
Many behavioral scientists propose and test interventions that attack policy problems by seeking to change individual behavior (adopting an “i-frame”) rather than the system in which they operate (an “s-frame”). Such i-frame interventions, which typically have small or null effects, reduce support from more effective systemic actions (such as regulation and taxation). For this reason, researchers advocating i-frame solutions may have unwittingly helped promote the interests of corporations who oppose systemic change.

[Book] Human-Centered AI

Human-Centered AI
In Human-Centered AI, Professor Ben Shneiderman offers an optimistic realist's guide to how artificial intelligence can be used to augment and enhance humans' lives.

Mind the gaps: how experience data can help fight climate change

The climate progress survey
A study by the World Economic Forum, Qualtrics and SAP suggests we are far from reaching a consensus about who is responsible for taking action on climate change and who is trusted to do so
Results suggest 81% of people say businesses are primarily responsible for taking action on climate change, yet only 28% trust businesses’ claims about sustainable practices.